Dxpat.com

Overview website for Czech Republic

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world…/geos/ez.html

Location of Czech Republic. Click flag or map to enlarge Opens in … Introduction ::Czech Republic …. People and Society ::Czech Republic …

www.eubusiness.com

The Czech Republic is a stable and prosperous market economy, which harmonized its laws and regulations with those of the EU prior to its EU …

www.soccerway.com/national/czech-republic/

Includes tables, results, fixtures, cups, and statistics.

www.letsgo.com

Throughout the Czech Republic, the vestiges of Bohemian glory and communist rule can be found on the same block. More recently, the ’90s sparked the …

www.factmonster.com

Information on Czech Republic — geography, history, politics, government, economy, … Economic summary: GDP/PPP (2009 est.) … Flag of Czech Republic …

There is a famous Czech saying, “co C(ech, to muzikant,” which means “every Czech is a musician,” which should give you some insight into the wealth of art and culture emanating from this wonderful country. Located right in the heart of Central Europe, the Czech Republic suffered a dark period prior to the fall of the iron curtain, but has since grown to become one of the most visited countries on the continent, with the capital, Prague, one of the most popular countries in the world, holding its own alongside the likes of London, New York and Tokyo. Backpackers and high-end holidaymakers are drawn to the Czech Republic in almost equal numbers, attracted by the historical sites, impressive range of architecture, vibrant nightlife, and wealth of outdoor activities.

Despite being a somewhat small country, the Czech Republic is one of the treasure troves of Europe, famed for its many UNECSCO World Heritage sites. Prague is peppered with sights and sounds to constantly keep your head turning, including the Charles Bridge, Prague Old Town and Jewish Quarter, the Astronomical Clock, and the glorious Prague Castle. To the south, you’ll find the medieval towns of Bohemia, Me(lník, and Kutná Hora, while to the west lie a number of luxury spa retreats, such as Karlštejn and Karlovy Vary, and many of the country’s national parks teeming with cycling, hiking and rock climbing from early spring to mid-fall, and skiing and snowboarding dominating the winter months.

Accommodation in the Czech Republic is no longer cheap and cheerful, with hotels just as expensive as anywhere in Western Europe. Standards have also risen and rival anywhere in the region for comfort and hospitality. Prague offers some of the finest and most interesting hotels in Europe, many of which make good use of restored historic buildings, along with a range of ?ber-modern boutique hotels. Outside the main cities are very tourist-friendly with options from luxury resorts to tiny pensions (family-run guest houses). For those with a zest for adventure and discovery, there are plenty of campsites spread out in the wilderness that are open from early March through to late October, typically catering to both campers and RVs, with some offering bungalows and cabins.

The Czech people have a reputation for being lovers of music, art, and beer, which is evident in the sheer number of jazz, rock, and blues clubs (many of which were part of the historical underground scene hailing from the 1950’s and ‘60s), concert halls and classical music venues, pubs and lounges. Art is everywhere, not only in the galleries and mobile exhibitions, but out on the streets and walls of alternative restaurants. As for the beer, the breweries of C(eské Bude(jovice and Pilsen are known to produce some of the best lagers in the world.

Daytrips should include excursions to the country’s quaint, picturesque towns such as C(eský Krumlov and Telc(, the Šumava National Park or perhaps a road trip through the rolling hills and forests of the east, stopping at one or two of its celebrated vineyards along the way. Those feeling more adventurous will enjoy navigating the pinnacles of the Adršpach-Teplice Rocks or transcending into the caves of Moravian Karst to marvel at the network of underground rivers and grottos.

Getting around the country’s big cities couldn’t be easier as the Czech Republic has one of the best developed infrastructures and public transportation systems in the western world, with a choice of buses, taxis, trams, trains, and a modern metro (subway) system in central Prague. Czech Railways has a network linking it to just about every place of interest and offers cheap rail passes good for three to 15 days.

Highlights

Walk across the famous Charles Bridge and take a walking tour of Prague’s romantic Old Town

Take in a classical concert at one of Prague’s many atmospheric venues, which include ancient churches, historic buildings and outdoor theaters

Go on a brewery tour and enjoy a pint in the home of Czech beer, Pilsen

Wander around the huge compound of Prague Castle, one of the oldest and largest fortresses in the world

Visit any of the country’s other 2,000-plus castles, keeps and ruins

Get pampered in the hot springs and mineral baths at one of West Bohemia’s famous spa resorts

Carve up the slopes at one of the Czech Republic’s ski resorts, such as Spindleruv Mlyn or Zacler

Hike and camp through the Sumava Forest, protected by the country’s largest national park

The Czech Republic became an independent state in January 1993 after Czechoslovakia split into its two constituent parts. Before World War II, Czechoslovakia was one of the 10 most industrialised states in the world, and the only central European country to remain a democracy until 1938.

The Czech capital, Prague, is more than 1 000 years old and has a wealth of historic architecture of different styles. Because of this, the city has become a favoured location for many international film makers.

Manufacturing is still a major economic activity, especially the production of automobiles, machine tools, and engineering products. Iron and steel industries are important in Moravia in the east of the country. The chief crops are maize, sugar beet, potatoes, wheat, barley, and rye.

Hills and mountains cover about 95% of the country – ideal for skiing, mountain biking and hill walking. Wild boar and foxes are found in the abundant woodlands.

The Czech Republic produces world-famous beer, including Pilsner. Wine is produced in the southern regions of Moravia and in part of Bohemia. A record 900 natural springs have also ensured that the country produces plenty of mineral water. Traditional dishes include “ knedlíky ”, a type of dumpling made from potatoes or bread.

Famous Czechs include the Art Nouveau artist Alfons Mucha, composers Antonin Dvorák and Bedrich Smetana, marathon runner Emil Zátopek and the writers Franz Kafka and Milan Kundera.

Economy Overview

The Czech Republic is a stable and prosperous market economy closely integrated with the EU, especially since the country’s EU accession in 2004. While the conservative, inward-looking Czech financial system has remained relatively healthy, the small, open, export-driven Czech economy remains sensitive to changes in the economic performance of its main export markets, especially Germany. When Western Europe and Germany fell into recession in late 2008, demand for Czech goods plunged, leading to double digit drops in industrial production and exports. As a result, real GDP fell 4.7% in 2009, with most of the decline occurring during the first quarter. Real GDP, however, slowly recovered with positive quarter-on-quarter growth starting in the second half of 2009 and continuing throughout 2011. In 2012, however, the economy fell into a recession due to a slump in external demand. The auto industry remains the largest single industry, and, together with its upstream suppliers, accounts for nearly 24% of Czech manufacturing. The Czech Republic produced more than a million cars for the first time in 2010, over 80% of which were exported. Foreign and domestic businesses alike voice concerns about corruption especially in public procurement. Other long term challenges include dealing with a rapidly aging population, funding an unsustainable pension and health care system, and diversifying away from manufacturing and toward a more high-tech, services-based, knowledge economy.

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