Dxpat.com

Housing website for Kyrgyzstan

www.numbeo.com

Average prices of restaurants, transportation, utilities, groceries and rents in Kyrgyzstan. Various interesting cost of living related economical indexes calculated …

www.trust.org/alertnet/news/kyrgyzstan-unique-housing-project/

The Danish Refugee Council builds permanent housing for a large group of returnee families in southern Kyrgyzstan. The initiative is part of an …

www.habitat.org

Currently, Habitat for Humanity Kyrgyzstan focuses on renovations of condominium buildings, finishing of halfbuilt homes and winterization or providing …

reliefweb.int/report/kyrgyzstan/kyrgyzstan-housing-quake-survivors

BY BOB HAM. Mercy Corps is helping house families left homeless after an Oct. 5 earthquake struck Kyrgyzstan’s mountainous Alai Region.

www.reach-initiative.org/wp…/ADB-ACTED-houses-Jalalabad.pdf

425. 458. 359. 372. 358. 393. 451. 389. 110. 391. 396. 394. 433. 434. 435. 407. 376. 439. 463. 379. 377. 399. 380. 438. 400. 448. 436. 385 …

Mercy Corps is helping house families left homeless after an Oct. 5 earthquake struck Kyrgyzstan’s mountainous Alai Region.

Emergency responders from the agency are procuring supplies to convert recycled shipping containers into mobile homes, using expertise gained in renovating schools and other buildings in the Central Asian nation. These shelters will be insulated, fitted with stoves for cooking and heating and will allow families to stay close to their villages so they can look after their crops and livestock.

The tremor in a sparsely populated area near Kyrgyzstan’s border with China left 74 dead and displaced more than 200 families, according to Kyrgyz authorities. Mercy Corps will help the government convert at least 10 shipping containers into temporary homes – especially critical to protect quake survivors as winter weather sets in.

Gifts to our Emergency Response Fund ensure that Mercy Corps has the wherewithal to respond quickly when disaster strikes. Please consider a generous donation today.

The majority of expats living in Kyrgyzstan will end up settling in either Bishkek, the capital, or Osh, the country’s second largest city. Accommodation in Kyrgyzstan is widely available and varied in nature; expats are just as likely to call a small room in a shared family house “home” (common for English teachers) as they are to unwind in a 3-room luxury apartment in a new mid-rise building.

accommodation in BishkekIf your employer is arranging your visa and work permit for you, it is likely that they will also arrange for your accommodation in Kyrgyzstan. If you have to arrange housing for yourself, reasonable accommodation is easy to find through word-of-mouth or through real estate agencies. There are several agencies in Bishkek with a few English speaking agents who can narrow down available properties depending on your budget and preferred neighborhood.

In recent years, more and more mid-rise luxury style apartment buildings have found their way into the Bishkek skyline; making for available reasonably priced, high-standard accommodation. These entities can go for as much as 1500 USD per month, but apartments in lesser complexes can be found for under 500 USD a month. Studio apartments can go for as little as 200 USD per month. Outside of the capital, most accommodations are cheaper than in Bishkek and fall into the category of Soviet-style apartment blocks or small houses.

One thing to note when searching for housing is that a place is advertised by the total number of rooms, not just the number of bedrooms. Therefore, what is called a studio apartment elsewhere is known as a 1-room apartment in Kyrgyzstan, a one-bedroom is called a 2-room apartment, etc.

Outstanding amenities such as swimming pools, gardens, and private yards, are uncommon in Kyrgyzstan, especially in the city centers where most expats choose to settle. Further away from the tightly packed urban spaces, expats can find houses with more personal space.

Furnished and semi-furnished apartments are the most common housing options. A semi-furnished apartment may require kitchen wares, linens, and small appliances. A fully furnished house will include everything needed to live comfortably and then some. Kyrgyz-style interior design usually subscribes to loud patterns, sparkly wallpaper, and the more gold, the better.

housing in kyrgyzstanThere are several furniture stores in larger cities but they all sell goods imported from China (inexpensive and poor quality), Turkey (expensive), or Europe (very expensive). There are also plenty of skilled craftsmen in Kyrgyzstan available to make furniture and housewares (like cabinets, tables, curtains) at a better price, but tracking down a quality worker can be difficult, especially without the necessary language skills.

Lease agreements in Kyrgyzstan can be simple verbal agreements or fully drafted legal documents. Be sure that it is made clear who will be responsible for paying for all utilities and taxes. The term of a lease agreement is usually flexible and most landlords will not require more than one month’s rent upfront or more than one month’s notice before moving out.

There should always be some form of security for any accommodation, whether there is a 24-hour security guard or a digital code to enter the building. Extra security on top of what is already available is usually unnecessary, although it is never a bad idea to have the landlord change all the locks before a new tenant arrives.

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