Dxpat.com

Housing website for Cambodia

www.country-data.com/cgi-bin/query/r-2121.html

Cambodia. Housing. The nuclear family, in rural Cambodia, typically lives in a rectangular house that may vary in size from four by six meters to six by ten meters …\

www.archdaily.com/…/cambodian-sustainable-housing-competition/

Courtesy of Building Trust International In partnership with Karuna Cambodia, Habitat for Humanity & the Cambodian Society of Architects …

www.bustler.net/index…/cambodian_sustainable_housing_competitio…

We are looking for designs that can provide a sustainable future for housing in the South-east Asian country. Any proposal will have to keep …

www.expat-blog.com/en/housing/asia/cambodia/

Buy and sell property in Cambodia, find an accommodation, rent a house in Cambodia and much more. Cambodia housing, real estate Cambodia.

www.nationsencyclopedia.com

Cambodia’s housing traditionally compared favorably with that of other countries in Southeast Asia. The most common type of dwelling consists of one or more …

The nuclear family, in rural Cambodia, typically lives in a rectangular house that may vary in size from four by six meters to six by ten meters. It is constructed of a wooden frame with gabled thatch roof and walls of woven bamboo. Khmer houses typically are raised on stilts as much as three meters for protection from annual floods. Two ladders or wooden staircases provide access to the house. The steep thatch roof overhanging the house walls protects the interior from rain. Typically a house contains three rooms separated by partitions of woven bamboo. The front room serves as a living room used to receive visitors, the next room is the parents’ bedroom, and the third is for unmarried daughters. Sons sleep anywhere they can find space. Family members and neighbors work together to build the house, and a house-raising ceremony is held upon its completion. The houses of poorer persons may contain only a single large room. Food is prepared in a separate kitchen located near the house but usually behind it. Toilet facilities consist of simple pits in the ground, located away from the house, that are covered up when filled. Any livestock is kept below the house.

Chinese and Vietnamese houses in Cambodian town and villages typically are built directly on the ground and have earthen, cement, or tile floors, depending upon the economic status of the owner. Urban housing and commercial buildings may be of brick, masonry, or wood.

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