Dxpat.com

Housing website for Bulgaria

www.bulgarianproperties.com/

Because we – BULGARIAN PROPERTIES – are the biggest and most respected Bulgarian real estate agency specializing exclusively in working with foreign …

www.globalpropertyguide.com › Europe › Bulgaria

A glance at changes in property, house and real estate prices in Bulgaria.

www.globalpropertyguide.com › Europe

A look at real estate investment in Bulgaria from the perspective of property income, taxes and Bulgarian investment prospects.

bulgaria.angloinfo.com/housing/

Whether your plan is to rent a flat or house, buy a property or build one, it is useful to know what to expect before beginning your search. Here’s where to get that …

www.mongabay.com/history/bulgaria/bulgaria-housing.html

Bulgaria-Housing from the Country Studies Program, formerly the Army Area Handbook Program.

Bulgaria’s housing market remains sluggish. Price declines are slowing, and the economy is improving a little, but the changes are happening so slowly that Bulgaria’s housing market seems unlikely to go anywhere soon.

In Q3 2012, the average price of existing flats in Bulgaria declined by 2.2% to BGN 881.2 (€451) per square metre (sq. m.), according to the National Statistical Institute (NSI). This price drop was a slight improvement on the 6.1% decline in 2011 and the 4.3% fall during the year to Q1 2012.

Property prices in Bulgaria are now 38% lower than at their Q3 2008 peak, when they reached BGN 1,418 (€725) per sq. m.

In Sofia, the capital, the average price of dwellings was down by 0.6% from a year earlier and by 41% from the peak, at BGN 1,447 (€740) per sq. m..

Out of 28 provinces of Bulgaria, 18 experienced price falls over the year to Q3 2012. Sharp price drops were recorded in Montana (-13.2%), Vratsa (-7.3%) and Pernik (-7.2%). Moderate price increases occurred in Targovishte (4.5%), Stara Zagora (4.5%) and Veliko Tarnovo (3.5%).

Bulgaria’s housing market remains sluggish. Price declines are slowing, and the economy is improving a little, but the changes are happening so slowly that Bulgaria’s housing market seems unlikely to go anywhere soon.

Bulgaria house prices In Q3 2012, the average price of existing flats in Bulgaria declined by 2.2% to BGN 881.2 (€451) per square metre (sq. m.), according to the National Statistical Institute (NSI). This price drop was a slight improvement on the 6.1% decline in 2011 and the 4.3% fall during the year to Q1 2012.

Property prices in Bulgaria are now 38% lower than at their Q3 2008 peak, when they reached BGN 1,418 (€725) per sq. m.

In Sofia, the capital, the average price of dwellings was down by 0.6% from a year earlier and by 41% from the peak, at BGN 1,447 (€740) per sq. m..

Out of 28 provinces of Bulgaria, 18 experienced price falls over the year to Q3 2012. Sharp price drops were recorded in Montana (-13.2%), Vratsa (-7.3%) and Pernik (-7.2%). Moderate price increases occurred in Targovishte (4.5%), Stara Zagora (4.5%) and Veliko Tarnovo (3.5%).

From 2000 to 2008, Bulgaria had a house price boom. Residential property prices surged by around 300%. However, the property bubble burst towards the end of 2008:

In 2009, the average dwelling price fell by 21.4% (-23.5% in real terms) from a year earlier;

In 2010, the average dwelling price fell by 10.1% (-12.2% in real terms);

In 2011, the average dwelling price plunged by 6.1% (-9.9% in real terms).

European Union citizens can now purchase properties in Bulgaria, including land. The 5-year moratorium on land purchases, set as a condition in the Accession Treaty between Republic of Bulgaria and The European Union, was lifted in January 1, 2012.

Previously, foreigners could purchase land only in the name of a legal entity and were not allowed to own a property. The lifting of the ban now gives European citizens the right to own property as individuals.

Bulgaria’s housing market remains sluggish. Price declines are slowing, and the economy is improving a little, but the changes are happening so slowly that Bulgaria’s housing market seems unlikely to go anywhere soon.

Bulgaria house prices In Q3 2012, the average price of existing flats in Bulgaria declined by 2.2% to BGN 881.2 (€451) per square metre (sq. m.), according to the National Statistical Institute (NSI). This price drop was a slight improvement on the 6.1% decline in 2011 and the 4.3% fall during the year to Q1 2012.

Property prices in Bulgaria are now 38% lower than at their Q3 2008 peak, when they reached BGN 1,418 (€725) per sq. m.

In Sofia, the capital, the average price of dwellings was down by 0.6% from a year earlier and by 41% from the peak, at BGN 1,447 (€740) per sq. m..

Out of 28 provinces of Bulgaria, 18 experienced price falls over the year to Q3 2012. Sharp price drops were recorded in Montana (-13.2%), Vratsa (-7.3%) and Pernik (-7.2%). Moderate price increases occurred in Targovishte (4.5%), Stara Zagora (4.5%) and Veliko Tarnovo (3.5%).

From 2000 to 2008, Bulgaria had a house price boom. Residential property prices surged by around 300%. However, the property bubble burst towards the end of 2008:

In 2009, the average dwelling price fell by 21.4% (-23.5% in real terms) from a year earlier;

In 2010, the average dwelling price fell by 10.1% (-12.2% in real terms);

In 2011, the average dwelling price plunged by 6.1% (-9.9% in real terms).

European Union citizens can now purchase properties in Bulgaria, including land. The 5-year moratorium on land purchases, set as a condition in the Accession Treaty between Republic of Bulgaria and The European Union, was lifted in January 1, 2012.

Previously, foreigners could purchase land only in the name of a legal entity and were not allowed to own a property. The lifting of the ban now gives European citizens the right to own property as individuals.

Everyone needs a roof over their head!

Whether your plan is to rent a flat or house, buy a property or build one, it is useful to know what to expect before beginning your search. Here’s where to get that information.

Confused by local terms? Refer to the Property Jargon Guide to decode words and abbreviations used in property advertisements online, in newspapers, and in the windows of estate agents.

Once you’ve found somewhere to live, find out how to get water, electricity, gas, telephone and the Internet set up, and where to shop for home furnishings and DIY supplies.

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