Dxpat.com

Business directory website for Bosnia Herzegovine

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Bosnia and Herzegovina. Company Directory from Bosnia and Herzegovina – European Business Marketplace, Europe B2B Directory, European Trade Leads …

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World, Inside Bosnia Herzegovina, Climbers. Go. Ideas? Bugs? … Bosnia Herzegovina Business Directory 0 routes in Region. List view Guide view Chat …

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Bosnia-and-Herzegovina Business Directory. Browse popular companies in Bosnia-and-Herzegovina offering a wide range of business services, including …

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Business schools & MBAs in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Not only you can study wherever, whenever you like, you also work together with fellow expatriates who …

Bosnia Herzegovine business directory: list of companies proposing their products and services to expatriates in Bosnia Herzegovine.

Bosnia and Herzegovina ranked next to The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as the poorest republic in the old Yugoslav federation. Although agriculture is almost all in private hands, farms are small and inefficient, and the republic traditionally is a net importer of food. Industry has been greatly overstaffed, one reflection of the socialist economic structure of Yugoslavia. Tito had pushed the development of military industries in the republic with the result that Bosnia hosted a large share of Yugoslavia’s defense plants. The bitter interethnic warfare in Bosnia caused production to plummet by 80% from 1990 to 1995, unemployment to soar, and human misery to multiply. With an uneasy peace in place, output recovered in 1996-99 at high percentage rates from a low base; but output growth slowed in 2000 and 2001. GDP remains far below the 1990 level. Economic data are of limited use because, although both entities issue figures, national-level statistics are limited. Moreover, official data do not capture the large share of activity that occurs on the black market. The konvertibilna marka – the national currency introduced in 1998 – is now pegged to the euro, and the Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina has dramatically increased its reserve holdings. Implementation of privatization, however, has been slow, and local entities only reluctantly support national-level institutions. Banking reform accelerated in 2001 as all the communist-era payments bureaus were shut down. The country receives substantial amounts of reconstruction assistance and humanitarian aid from the international community but will have to prepare for an era of declining assistance.

The official currency is the konvertibilna marka (convertible Mark), at a fixed rate of 1.95 towards the Euro (1 EUR = 1.95 KM).

There are two sets of KM banknotes, with distinct designs for the Federation and the Republic of Srpska. However, both sets are valid anywhere in the country.

Before you leave the country, be sure to convert back any unused KM into something common (Euros, dollars) as most other countries will not exchange KM.

Credit cards are not widely accepted – ATMs are available in the most cities (VISA and Maestro). Try to not pay with 100 KM bills, as smaller shops might not have enough change.

Most towns and cities will have markets and fares where any number of artisans, sellers, and dealers will offer any kind of stock. Different foods are readily available, both fresh and cooked, as well as clothing, jewellery and souvenirs. At the markets you are able to negotiate with the seller, although that may take some practice. Like in most such venues prices may be inflated for foreigners based on a quick ‘means test’ made by the seller. Often those who look like they can afford more will be asked to pay more.

Large shopping centres you’ll find in most cities and towns.

Sarajevo is fine for buying clothes and shoes of cheap quality and relatively cheap price. The main shopping streets of Sarajevo are also great for black market products including the latest DVDs, video games and music CDs. Most tourists who visit Sarajevo no doubt leave with a few DVDs to take back home.

Visoko and the central Bosnia region are very well known for their leather work.

Banjaluka has seven big shopping malls, as well many small businesses, and you will be able to find a large variety of goods.

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